Just Merveilleux?

Life at № 42

Comments not loading + this brand new life

I click on the orange thingy on the upper right hand of the screen and nothing happens. That means I can only answer comments from the post itself, and then I’m not sure if the comment was to me or someone else… Is it wordpress or is it me?

I’m diving back into work, as in my regular art-related work. Trying to restore the house, reform six apartments and research art all at the same time is complicated. I’m pretty sure that’s why I blog- it’s the ideal way to procrastinate without feeling guilty. After all, all the other tabs that are open look very much like I’m working.

tabs

Actual work on the flats moves from the planning stage to the actual work phase this Wednesday. Very exciting.

I’ve decided to make my way back to my old specialty which is tapestries. I’ve spent most of the crisis years doing a whole lot of donkey work by selling mostly silverware- and there’s nothing particularly interesting or exciting about that. You buy it, you polish it, you read the hallmarks and you sell it. It requires no great knowledge or effort.

A tapestry on the other hand, except for the very famous ones, is usually a mystery. It starts off with an artist creating the original painting (called a carton/cartoon.) A traditional version looks like this:

See original image

Identifying the artist who painted the cartoon can make a tremendous difference to an item’s market value. It can also help with the next stage which is identifying where it was made and in a perfect world the actual atelier responsible for the weaving. Sometimes we can narrow it down by the colours and style, sometimes we have clues like hard to decipher signatures:

See original image

Sometimes you have to go through hundreds of books to finally find a reference for a signature like that. I know most people would find it boring, but I find it incredibly exciting. The one above is Martin Reynbouts (Brussels) on a piece that’s housed at the Musées Royaux d’Art et d’Histoire.

But most of the time tapestries aren’t signed at all- with the exception of pieces made in Aubusson after the town was given royal appointment status and strict rules were drawn out (17th century.) When we don’t have much to go on, we have to be creative with the research.

Look at this detail of a piece I’ve been working on this month:

aubussonbridgetapestry

The tapestry itself is generic enough it could be anything- so not having much to go on I decided to street-view bridges in towns that had major tapestry manufacturers. Then suddenly I found a building right next to a bridge that had the same funny promontory over the river held up by wood beams. And to the left there was also an oddly positioned extension. So I started looking up old pictures to compare it to and found this:

aubussonbridge2

Fantastic, but the roof is different… what happened? According to old newspapers, a fire happened in the early 19th century. They never re-built the two upper floors. So now I’ve not only got a place, but I also have a probable timeframe (pre-fire). Next, let’s see if I can figure out the who. And now I should really get back to work instead of boring people!

 

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17 comments on “Comments not loading + this brand new life

  1. Hariod Brawn
    November 9, 2015

    You’d make a wonderful private dick Mr. M.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. inspiredbythedivine1
    November 9, 2015

    I think it’s WP as I’ve had similar issues.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. john zande
    November 9, 2015

    Mine was buggering up over the weekend, too

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Helen Devries
    November 9, 2015

    That sort of investigation fascinates me…if I didn’t let myself wander off on the byways.

    Like

  5. siriusbizinus
    November 9, 2015

    Best of luck to you on your investigation!

    And yeah, WP must be playing with the code again. If they’d just stop touching it, nobody would complain…

    Liked by 1 person

  6. makagutu
    November 9, 2015

    That does sound interesting

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Clare Flourish
    November 9, 2015

    Try this link: https://justmerveilleux.wordpress.com/wp-admin/edit-comments.php

    It is not a problem I have had, mainly because I get few comments. One recent post has been facebook shared a lot by trans folk wanting to hear it’s alright really, and has lots of views, but few comments.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. acflory
    November 9, 2015

    Wow… not boring at ALL! I had no idea art historians were really sleuths…and had a lot of fun sleuthing. 🙂 Definitely want to know about that piece of tapestry.

    Like

    • acflory
      November 9, 2015

      Oh and p.s. I’ve had the exact same problem with notifications – i.e. not being able to see them. From memory, the problem just ‘went away’, however that might have had something to do with a complaint I left on the WordPress.com support forum. I never did get an answer, but as I say, the problem went away. -shrug- Worth a try.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Mr. Merveilleux
      November 10, 2015

      It depends in which particular area one works in- but for those of us who are dealers or work for auction houses, research is a huge part of what we do. And we don’t just need to know what’s what, but also what sells best where and for how much 🙂

      Like

      • acflory
        November 10, 2015

        Which brings me to a question – how on earth did you get into the field in the first place?

        Like

  9. davidprosser
    November 10, 2015

    If your detective work does show who did the work it would be nice if you share how you came by it, and who it is. This kind of work is fascinating.
    Hugs

    Like

  10. theoccasionalman
    November 15, 2015

    It’s not boring. Seeing people do what they love is always fascinating.

    Like

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This entry was posted on November 9, 2015 by in life and tagged , , , .
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