My Mazamet

Life at № 42

Tag Archives: psychology

A Hanging, our Mazaversary and Various Other Versaries

The Hanging: It looks right. It was March 2015 when we arrived at number 42. Many corners have been turned since, but now it looks as if the big ones … Continue reading

March 29, 2019 · 41 Comments

As I Walk Through the Valley of the Shadows of Hungry Ghosts

Or is it goats? Worry not, this isn’t a depressing post! I’m actually feeling very well. But this is a haphazard post which basically goes nowhere, so be warned. I’ve been … Continue reading

January 29, 2019 · 44 Comments

If the grass is greener on one’s own side – does one stop watering?

So confusing! I opened an upstairs window this week to this image. People here let their grass go brown in summer. I went looking around and it seems everyone does … Continue reading

August 30, 2018 · 37 Comments

This map shows what white Europeans associate with race

“… Each country on the map is coloured according to the average score of test takers from that country. Redder countries show higher average bias, bluer countries show lower average … Continue reading

August 11, 2018 · 75 Comments

Denialism: what drives people to reject the truth by Keith Kahn-Harris

“In recent years, the term has been used to describe a number of fields of “scholarship”, whose scholars engage in audacious projects to hold back, against seemingly insurmountable odds, the … Continue reading

August 5, 2018 · 35 Comments

The Magnificent Hannah Gadsby Monologue

” … because I still have shame. You learn from the part of the story you focus on. I need to tell my story properly. Because the closet, for me, … Continue reading

June 24, 2018 · 44 Comments

An Evening with Patrick Melrose or why the worse thing that ever happened to me was that I wasn’t an orphan.

Saturday evening in Mazamet. June 9th. The weather is mild. There’s a street party in the centre of town. From the garden we can hear music in the distance. For … Continue reading

June 10, 2018 · 71 Comments

Chris Hayes: What ‘Law and Order’ Means to Trump – The New York Times

“… In this view, crime is not defined by a specific offense. Crime is defined by who commits it. If a young black man grabs a white woman by the … Continue reading

March 18, 2018 · 28 Comments

Titles are boring

This was the last Christmas of my 30’s. Then the last New Years of my 30’s. Then the last January 4th of my 30’s. Today it’s the last January 17th … Continue reading

January 17, 2018 · 80 Comments

How the oligarchy wins: lessons from ancient Greece | Ganesh Sitaramanan | Opinion | The Guardian

“To understand that, we can turn to an instant classic from a few years ago, Jeffrey Winters’ Oligarchy. Winters argues that the key to oligarchy is that a set of … Continue reading

October 16, 2017 · 11 Comments

It’s an alpha male thing: what dominant chimpanzees and Donald Trump have in common | via The Guardian

“Chimpanzee politics can be intricate, but they always obey the rules of social dominance. Because chimps and humans evolved from a common ancestor going back 5-7m years, we humans know … Continue reading

September 15, 2017 · 13 Comments

How the aristocracy preserved their power | Chris Bryant

“Historically, the British aristocracy’s defining feature was not a noble aspiration to serve the common weal but a desperate desire for self-advancement. They stole land under the pretence of piety … Continue reading

September 7, 2017 · 32 Comments

Why Are Americans So Afraid? | Class Warfare Blog

“I was reading an article over at AlterNet with the title above. The subtitle is “Facts Take a Backseat to Deeply Ingrained Fears.” That article takes a fact-based approach in … Continue reading

August 3, 2017 · 8 Comments

Of what we feel – and don’t feel.

After posting that little excerpt from The End of Eddy I ended up reading the English version yesterday. Excellent, although the translation isn’t quite as stylish as the French original; … Continue reading

July 17, 2017 · 21 Comments

Update: Ten Types of Human by Dexter Dias

Absolutely worth the time! The title may be off-putting because it’s gimmicky- but the contents of the book are not. He uses the Ten Types format as an outline to … Continue reading

June 27, 2017 · 16 Comments

Must See: Betting On Zero

  “From ‘Darfur Now’ writer/director Ted Braun comes a riveting docu-thriller following controversial hedge fund titan Bill Ackman as he puts a billion dollars on the line in his crusade … Continue reading

June 3, 2017 · 10 Comments

The science of inequality: why people prefer unequal societies | Inequality | The Guardian

“… For example, studies of income and happiness have revealed that, once a basic level of wealth is achieved, relative wealth is more important for overall happiness. Similarly, a vast … Continue reading

May 4, 2017 · 31 Comments

Does Revenge Serve an Evolutionary Purpose? – Scientific American

“Why all the celebration after the killing of Osama bin Laden? A psychologist who studies evolution and human behavior explains the complex desire for vengeance” Source: Does Revenge Serve an … Continue reading

April 27, 2017 · 14 Comments

Heuristics & Biases (borrowed from GSU)

I love graphs and tables 😀 This one is amusing. The more I look through comments on newspapers and blogs, the more I notice the extent to which people rely … Continue reading

April 5, 2017 · 10 Comments

The Last Shaman by James Freeman

This documentary is now on Netflix. Interesting concept. James suffers from acute depression. He’s tired. He’s tried all sorts of treatments but nothing has really worked. He decides to “give … Continue reading

January 20, 2017 · 31 Comments

Little- thinking

When I was little I sometimes wished an aeroplane would crash. This was generally to get rid of a single person- which makes it terribly inefficient methodologically. Wishing for choking would’ve … Continue reading

January 11, 2017 · 15 Comments

Stufen

I remember being 10 and sitting in the back seat of the car (a town car), my parents were up front, and I asked them why they thought they should … Continue reading

December 29, 2016 · 80 Comments

Why we are willing to pay for mega expensive things

by Paul Harrison Director, Centre for Employee and Consumer Wellbeing; Senior lecturer, Deakin Business School- The Conversation Australia “It may not seem logical or good value for money, but there are … Continue reading

December 29, 2016 · 31 Comments

What Trump Exposed About the G.O.P. – The New York Times

  Best analysis yet. By a mile! By MARK SCHMITT NOV. 11, 2016 The election of 2016 is the culmination of this ideological era, but ironically reveals its hollowness. The … Continue reading

November 12, 2016 · 79 Comments

What Do Trump and Marx Have in Common? – The New York Times

HAMBURG, Germany — “We have a word in German, “Wutbürger,” which means “angry citizen” — though like many German compound words, its meaning can never quite be captured in a … Continue reading

October 30, 2016 · 61 Comments

The Mask You Live In – Coalition of the Brave. The harm patriarchy inflicts on… men.

Video post. Source: The Mask You Live In – Coalition of the Brave

July 5, 2016 · 3 Comments

A Lesson From ‘Brexit’: On Immigration, Feelings Trump Facts – The New York Times

“Many citizens, particularly those who have suffered under the economic pressures of globalization, express their anxiety over these changes by focusing on another form of change: foreigners in their midst. … Continue reading

June 29, 2016 · 11 Comments

Outstanding documentary – The Dishonesty Project (The Matrix Experiment)

(Dis)Honesty – The Truth About Lies: Feature Film It’s human nature to lie; we all do it! From scandalous headlines to little white lies, (Dis)Honesty – The Truth About Lies … Continue reading

June 16, 2016 · 15 Comments

A Tildeb Moment: The dangers of interpretation bias

As I said a few days ago, this blogging thing is fascinating. Yesterday Tildeb was pointing out in one of his comments the dangers of interpretation bias. That is, when an … Continue reading

December 28, 2015 · 32 Comments

Are the Best Things in Life Free? – The New York Times

Turning Points asked Yao Chen, Karl Lagerfeld, Andreja Pejic, Yanis Varoufakis, Richard Hell and others why people are so rarely satisfied with life’s necessities. Continue reading: Are the Best Things … Continue reading

December 11, 2015 · 20 Comments

Please do detest me; and don’t hesitate to offend me.

  Just because I think I wouldn’t be half the person I am had I not been as truculent as I was born to be. The other day someone from … Continue reading

December 7, 2015 · 19 Comments

An interesting point in life: donotgiveadamnism

Fabulous, really. I’m only just now realizing how much of life is reflective (in the reactive rather than thoughtful sense.) I can’t quantify it precisely, but it seems to me … Continue reading

September 23, 2015 · 12 Comments

Existentialist Nights. Do you ever ask yourself why?

Some nights I wonder. Everything has always had to be so bombastic. I don’t think I’ll ever be cured of that. It’s become a part of me- that rush. A … Continue reading

August 30, 2015 · 28 Comments