My Mazamet

Life at № 42

(Often Overlooked) Modern Artistic Wonders of Weaving

Romulus and Remus, A narrative classical tapestry, Madrid, woven by Artesanía Española  dated MCMXLI (1941), copy after a 16th century (1525-1530) Brussels cartoon, from the circle of Bernard van Orley (ca. 1492-1542), border design after Joss van Liere

via tapestry ||| sotheby’s

This is up for auction again – not sure why, but usually when things come up for sale just a year or two after they were auctioned off it means divorce or some such. In any event it’s an out of this world piece. Last time it got £22,500 (just over 27k US$) which considering the magnificence of the weaving doesn’t seem too bad. It just would not be viable to have something like that made today for anywhere remotely near that price.

In the past people have routinely made the mistake of focusing just on period rather than on beauty or quality for that matter. So despite my many criticisms of the art/antiques market today, it’s a positive thing that a whole range of 20th century works now get the attention and prices they deserve. A few of them are Maison Charles,   Maison Bagues (still open) and Spanish tapestries and carpets by the RFT (Real Fábrica de Tapices), (General Franco’s) Fundación de Gremios or Miguel Stuyck. Spain produced the finest of the kind in the 20th century probably because labour was relatively cheap as compared to the other European weaving centres. Recently a Goya piece done by the RFT in 1980 sold for a substantial amount (thank you Google Cached Copies!) by a Texas gallery.

And just for the gorgeousness of it, here’s the jaw-dropping hall at the Chateau de Groussay which has a whole set of Goya tapestries from the same 20th century series:

But that doesn’t mean you can’t still get a bargain. Coming up for auction next week at Ansorena is this exquisite savonnerie.

In times of uncertainty buying good art is almost always a good move (if you can spare the money and follow good advice.) It’s taken me a long time to convince him, but Mike’s finally come around to the idea that instead of focusing on selling/selling/selling there are pieces we should just set aside, hang on a wall or put on a table and let them sit there, waiting for their moment. Also, some things look really excellent where they are, like the Vivrel painting at the top of the stairs.

In other art news we sold an absolutely stunning Our Lady of Hope recently. She’s gone to live in Texas (two Texases  in one post! What are the chances?). The realism of her face is just incredible, and her earrings are real coral and silver. Sublime. Another even larger piece should be arriving at number 42 next week. It’s coming from one of the Cofradias (Religious Brotherhoods) in Spain. It’s been a tough year and many of them are trying to raise funds.

20 comments on “(Often Overlooked) Modern Artistic Wonders of Weaving

  1. merilee
    May 19, 2020

    Is the Our Lady a sculpture?

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Kris
    May 19, 2020

    I love the Vivrel! Especially the context of the environmental colors and sunlight. It’s beautifully placed. Your life is fascinating.

    Liked by 1 person

    • The Pink Agendist
      May 19, 2020

      I love the colours too! There’s something wonderfully uplifting about it. My life gives the impression of fascinating here but behind the scenes I’m cooking and cleaning like everyone else 🙂

      Liked by 3 people

      • acflory
        May 20, 2020

        lol – are you also baking like crazy? My oven hasn’t had a workout like this in…ever!

        Liked by 1 person

      • The Pink Agendist
        May 20, 2020

        Baking, marinating, compote-ing 😀

        Liked by 2 people

      • acflory
        May 21, 2020

        lol – same! And let’s not forget the all important one….eating. 😉

        Liked by 1 person

  3. acflory
    May 20, 2020

    Just beautiful. It’s painting with thread. My aunt created some beautiful tapestries and I was lucky enough to inherit a few. Had them framed to protect them. Now they have pride of place on my walls. Artwork you live with should be artwork you love, regardless of price. I hope you keep that lovely painting above the stairs. Stay well, both of you.

    Liked by 1 person

    • The Pink Agendist
      May 20, 2020

      You should follow the link for the first tapestry because you can zoom in to see the detail. It’s just magnificent. I think we can call it the earliest form of pixelation. And imagine doing that with they eye!?! It takes incredible talent and skill.

      Liked by 1 person

      • acflory
        May 21, 2020

        OMG…I had no idea you could zoom in like that. Assumed it was just a link to Sotheby’s website generally. The tapestry truly is superb, and the closer you get the /better/ it becomes. So much detail, including actual expressions on the faces. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  4. curiousgeorgina
    May 20, 2020

    The Madonna is so beautiful! I have a modern copy from Mexico but unfortunately the faces on the copies are laughable compared to this one in your pictures. Hopefully I’ll be able to get a real one like this one day 🙂

    Like

    • The Pink Agendist
      May 20, 2020

      Do you mean like this piece? The faces on copies tend to have rough features, but they’re very decorative nonetheless.
      The older and finer pieces are very special. They were created to be placed on altars or processioned through the streets so a huge amount of work went in to making them “divine”. That little bit extra that stirs the emotions.

      Like

  5. Anonymole
    May 22, 2020

    Um, not to be a party-pooper or anything, but it looks like your “Our Lady of Hope” is holding a dead child from the position of her arms and her facial expression.

    Otherwise, um, cool rugs. Kick ’em in the corner and let’s dance.

    Liked by 1 person

    • The Pink Agendist
      May 22, 2020

      Let me guess – you ***didn’t*** grow up in a Catholic environment?

      Liked by 1 person

      • Anonymole
        May 22, 2020

        Ah, so that’s NOT a dead kid. Boy, she sure looks sad though. Maybe she’s lamenting the future damage that kid will cause hundreds and thousands of years into the future.

        Liked by 1 person

      • The Pink Agendist
        May 22, 2020

        I suppose if you want to rewrite that story you could make it so she’s having a premonition 😀

        Like

  6. Steve Ruis
    June 2, 2020

    Our lady of hope doesn’t look as if she has much hope. I would expect her face to show determination, animation, something.

    So many women in art are painted as idealized “Madonnas” or dour/sour faced people, seeming unhappy with their fate. At best we get a bit of a wry smile Botticelli’s Birth of Venus, the Mona Lisa, etc.

    Occasionally a Dutch master shows a woman in full force enjoying life, but that is the exception, not the rule.

    Ah, everyone is a critic … even me!

    Greetings from the third world country, the US!

    Liked by 1 person

    • The Pink Agendist
      June 3, 2020

      Interestingly Our Ladies of Hope are often portrayed in tears. The very good kind have tears made of crystal drops, like this:

      Like

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This entry was posted on May 19, 2020 by in art and tagged , , , .
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