My Mazamet

Life at № 42

An 18th Century Walnut Sofa, Circa 1730; And other thoughts including on people who see Jesus on toast

It’s a very conservative estimate, but there’s a chance someone will end up with an outstanding piece of furniture for a very reasonable price. I still find it baffling that pieces of this exceptional quality are being sold for so little. Mike’s mother told me (a long time ago) that that’s how things were right after the war. She got the Venetian blackamoor (now ours) and a giltwood Italian table with a tooled red leather top (now Mike’s sister’s) in what were essentially junk shops.  Then the prices went up, then down, then up, and now down again. But whenever people ask me what to invest in, I stand firmly with this stuff. Sturdy, well built, classic pieces. If you want a fresher look, just upholster it in crisp white or beige linen. This sofa is at a very good auction coming up at Sotheby’s with many reasonably priced (under £1000) items. Look out for the circa 1775 marquetry dresser, lot 40, it’s a show stopper, but unfortunately not under 1000 🙂


Yesterday we watched Cracked Up, The Darrel Hammond Story. Engrossing, fascinating, heartbreaking. I highly recommend it – probably because I’m still (and increasingly) interested in the aftermath of childhood trauma. It’s amazing how long it can take us to come to terms with things, even basic things like the very meanings of words. What is abuse? What is trauma? What is the “normal” functioning of the mind in reaction to extreme circumstances, as opposed to the brain that misinterprets and then misfires?
It’s been raining and cloudy in the past few days. Ideal weather for the documentary and the conversations that ensued; Namely my disconnect to the outside world. After Mike’s cancer episode a few months ago, he says he worries that he is my only connection to the outside. I don’t think this is a surmountable mount. For the most part, I just don’t have the energy to deal with the things that go on out there.

Oh yes, you know how some people see Jesus on toast, well, let me introduce you to Rudy in Ivy.

In other news we’ve started cleaning up the house as we normally would for when Summer Girls come. The virus thing will probably mean they can’t come this year, but we decided that if that’s the case we’re going to make cardboard cutouts of them and pretend they’re here anyway.

34 comments on “An 18th Century Walnut Sofa, Circa 1730; And other thoughts including on people who see Jesus on toast

  1. inspiredbythedivine1
    May 12, 2020

    “Rudy in ivy!” Wonderful! What a blessed, and all-powerful, dog you have there! Truly, a miracle. It’s the only logical explanation.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Steve Ruis
    May 12, 2020

    Wait, Rudy is the Messiah? Very cool! You’ll probably need a branding consultant, numerous Internet influencers, etc. (Jesus doesn’t know what his is in for if he comes!)

    Liked by 2 people

  3. acflory
    May 12, 2020

    My Mum had an eye for antiques, but this was in early 60’s Australia when everyone wanted vinyl. -shudder- Mum picked up some lovely pieces, nothing super old, but nice solid pieces for a song. They’re all mine now. 🙂
    Speaking of now, now is probably not the time for you to re-engage with the outside world. But when this all ends, that world could be quite different, possibly even better. Might be a nice time to reconnect. 🙂
    I love the green Rudy. If there were to be an afterlife I’d like to spend it with my four legged friends. -huge hugs-

    Liked by 2 people

    • The Pink Agendist
      May 12, 2020

      I love the green Rudy too. Makes me smile every time I go through the hall as he faces the entrance doors.

      Liked by 1 person

      • acflory
        May 12, 2020

        All of my fur babies are buried under rose bushes and I say hello to them every day. It’s nice.

        Like

  4. Clare Flourish
    May 12, 2020

    Mine is the normal functioning of the mind after trauma. There are a lot of outdated coping strategies; but there’s also something noticing the cause of trauma has gone, and slowly letting those coping strategies go. Even when the coping strategies seem the only way to survive, you find a way round them eventually.

    Liked by 1 person

    • The Pink Agendist
      May 12, 2020

      Indeed. But it’s an enormous hurdle getting past those automatic reactions, isn’t it? Un-training the brain from perceiving threats is so hard to do. Even someone’s tone or passing comment can flick the switch.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. foolsmusings
    May 12, 2020

    I’ll happily follow Rudy Jesus 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Anonymole
    May 12, 2020

    Why go out into the world when your secluded one is so engaging?

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Robert A. Vella
    May 12, 2020

    Hail Bush Dog God!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. clubschadenfreude
    May 12, 2020

    great to see Rudy 🙂 I remember once being quite poor and seeing this fabulous victorian settee in a thrift shop. It was dirt cheap but we didn’t even have that much at then.

    I’ve been working with a therapist about childhood emotional neglect and being a hypersensitive person. It’s helped though I’m annoyed at myself for not coming upon those ideas sooner. I don’t quite dislike my parents as much as I used to.

    Liked by 1 person

    • The Pink Agendist
      May 12, 2020

      I wish I’d understood sooner too, but we’re not alone. Darrell Hammond and many others, me included, were diagnosed with all sorts of things before finally coming to the conclusion it’s about trauma. In fact the denial is part of the brain’s defence mechanism.

      Like

  9. Jo
    May 12, 2020

    Cardboard cutouts would be excellent. Like a cardboard version of weekend at Bernies.

    I love this. You so need to do it!

    Liked by 1 person

    • The Pink Agendist
      May 12, 2020

      We will. And then we can pretend we’re deranged serial killers or actors in that absurd skit they play in Germany for New Year’s Eve every year https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BN9edpdCH7c

      Liked by 2 people

      • Helen Devries
        May 13, 2020

        Dinner For One..a must in this household in solidarity with German friends. Costa Rican friends think it tells them all they need to know about the Euroepan mentality.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Jo
        May 13, 2020

        Dinner for one is the greatest German tradition ever. Just behind innocently massing their Panzers on your border…

        I fully endorse this endeavor. Skål!

        Liked by 1 person

  10. john zande
    May 12, 2020

    Ivy has always been a reliable conduit to the other side of the rainbow bridge.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Helen Devries
    May 13, 2020

    So Rudy is always there….more things in heaven and earth Horatio…

    Liked by 1 person

    • The Pink Agendist
      May 13, 2020

      Exactly! In life he was ever present, like Ninja Cat but much less discreet, so it’s fitting that he’s still always there.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Bela Johnson
    May 13, 2020

    Rudy in ivy! Summer girl cutouts. And we say we lack creativity at times 😉

    As for childhood trauma, I, too have wondered what ‘normal’ is. And what I have come up with is that we have not come into this life without purpose. Humans learn best through adversity, and if there is no time or space in the quantum field, children are old souls, too. It’s a continuum. So I embrace where I have been, am grateful I have the power of choice, and help others where I can. If COVID imparts no other lesson, it’s that we’re all in ‘this’ together. This world, this life. ❤

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Hariod Brawn
    May 16, 2020

    ‘I still find it baffling that pieces of this exceptional quality are being sold for so little.’

    ‘Cause they’re bloody uncomfortbale mate innit.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Hariod Brawn
    May 17, 2020

    DFS me innit mate.

    Liked by 1 person

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This entry was posted on May 12, 2020 by in art, gardens, thinking aloud and tagged , , , , .
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