My Mazamet

Life at № 42

Like stepping into a Jane Austen novel: The Harveys and the Herrings

To the left the Harveys, to the right the Herrings (of Norwich/Norfolk), in this most unusual portrait painted in 1820 by Joseph Clover, when the two prominent families were united by marriage. There are two versions of this painting, one in a British museum and the other in Texas, property of Harlan & Kathy Crow where it graces their neo-Georgian estate. I found the record for their purchase of it in 2001 from Christie’s (it got more than double the estimate). And here it is in their house:

Interesting concept, I imagine Clover was borrowing from Hogarth’s Servants (1750), and also from classical studies – like Rubens’ Head of a Negro

 

I’ve been sorting through all this information as I research a portrait I found recently of a Mrs. Herring who happens to be in the group picture. I love the idea of painting all these people together, and what must’ve been a very interesting process of getting people to participate (or not!). Imagine the politics of who gets to be where in the picture. He also painted the Harveys on their own:

Image: The Harvey Family of Norwich (painting)

Here’s the catalogue note:

“… inscribed ‘ALTERI SIC TIBI’ within a coat-of-arms (upper left) and ‘DUM SPIRO SPERO’ within a coat-of-arms (upper right); inscribed with the names of the individual sitters on the reverse, oil on canvas 48 3/4 x 72 1/4 in. (123.8 x 183.5 cm.)

NOTES This unusual group portrait is of members of two Norfolk families, the Harveys and the Herrings, and would appear to celebrate the union of two families which had occurred through the marriage of William Herring of Heathersett Hall (d.1842) who was a manufacturer, and Sheriff of Norwich in 1831, and Sarah Harvey, daughter of Charles Harvey M.P.. The young boy in the centre is their son, William Henry Harvey (1813-after 1870). On the left hand side of the picture, the Harveys, a prominent Norwich family, many of whom were Mayors and Sheriffs, are individually portrayed beneath their arms and motto, ALTERI SIC TIBI. The older generation Robert Harvey of Catton and Tharston Hall (c.1730-1816), Sheriff and Mayor of Norwich, and his wife Judith, daughter of Captain Onley are at the top. The latter’s brother and co-heir, Rev. Charles Onley of Sisted Hall, Essex, is alongside. Their children, Charles and Charlotte Harvey, John Harvey (1755-1842) and Robert Harvey (1751-1820) prominent wool manufacturers, are shown beneath. Beneath this group are the next generation, Onley, Judith Turner ( nee Harvey) and Charles Robert Turner (1789-1876), Caroline Mary Harvey and the sister of Charles Harvey, Mrs Morison and Charlotte’s brother, Samuel Haynes. The Herrings, depicted on the right, were predominantly merchants and bankers from Norwich, and their arms, depicted in the top right hand corner and inscribed with the family motto DUM SPIRO SPERO, were granted in 1826 to John Herring of the City of Norwich. John Herring (1718-1786), centre-right, was said to be a havel and slea maker. He married Anne Smith of Beccles, beside him. Below them are their children with their respective wives, their eldest son John (1749-1810) who married Rebecca Buckle, James Herring and his second wife Elizabeth  (nee Leachment) and John Herring’s brother and his wife, William and Elizabeth. The eldest son of John and Rebecca Herring, John (1774-1842) and his wife Catharine are in the top right corner beneath their arms. His brothers and their wives are beneath him, Thomas and Ann, William and Sarah ( n‚e Harvey), John Barwell and Laura ( nee Manby), Thomas Herring Buckle, a drug merchant and William Herring of and his wife Sarah. It is believed that this picture is by Joseph Clover (1779-1853), and not Joseph Glover. A companion picture is in the Norwich Castle Museum.”

 

 

19 comments on “Like stepping into a Jane Austen novel: The Harveys and the Herrings

  1. Judi Castille
    June 18, 2019

    Did you sort Mrs Herring’s research out?

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Steve Ruis
    June 18, 2019

    The Clover painting seems off center. Was it “trimmed” at some point?

    So the nineteenth century had “selfies.” I guess they weren’t so backward as we thought.

    Like

    • The Pink Agendist
      June 18, 2019

      I wondered the same thing! But no, it seems this was intentional.

      Like

      • Arkenaten
        June 18, 2019

        Odd, in that case.
        It looks like a bad case of photoshop cropping!

        Liked by 1 person

      • The Pink Agendist
        June 18, 2019

        It was probably one of those cases, like when we’re writing Happy Birthday on a sign and the H is huge and then the letters have to get smaller and smaller as we go 😁. Or maybe they added more family members at the last minute.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Robert A. Vella
    June 18, 2019

    I’m neither artistic nor do I have much knowledge of art, but the painting looks unique and of high quality to me.

    Liked by 1 person

    • The Pink Agendist
      June 18, 2019

      The uniqueness is where its value is at. The one in Texas got over US$60k in 2001 which is huge considering the artist isn’t terribly well known.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Anony Mole
    June 19, 2019

    This feels like I’m in 2236 and I’ve just found a pristine copy of a 2019 People magazine. Little do I know that, back in the early 21st Century, folks despised People magazine. Gak.

    Show me a painting of dogs, fruit bowls, cheese, or, egads—cats. I’d settle for a milk maiden and livery boy frolicking in the hay.

    Liked by 1 person

    • The Pink Agendist
      June 19, 2019

      Most of the time I live somewhere between the 16th and 19th centuries, so I know what you mean 😀

      Like

  5. makagutu
    June 19, 2019

    This is before group selfies.
    Looks like a great piece of work.
    Greetings Pink

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Bela Johnson
    June 19, 2019

    It IS an interesting painting, these sorts of paintings ARE, but I would never wish to live with them in my home – too many ghosts! In my opinion, they are museum pieces, and why I have long been drawn to museums when I must venture into cities. Character studies are ever fascinating, yet for all we might learn of them, much is conjecture from the outside in. What interests me about people is from the inside out, because all of that is still in motion, in process, in a state of discovery and becoming. The other is, like a painting, static and frozen in a time we can only imagine but not truly experience. Carry on, as you will. ☺️ Aloha

    Liked by 1 person

    • The Pink Agendist
      June 20, 2019

      I don’t think I’d have this one, but I do like old portraits when it’s an interesting person or backstory. Would you hang a picture of a person at home?

      Liked by 1 person

      • Bela Johnson
        June 20, 2019

        I have an original painting of hands. And another, an empress. Both are fictional, shall we say. Not abstract, but not actual people who lived and breathed.

        I’m sort of like the Greek islanders back in the day many years ago, who would turn their back on you if you tried to take a photograph of them. They felt as though an image would capture their soul. Those paintings you featured have a bit of that in them, at least to my mind. Life is complicated enough without living with ghosts of other people. 🥺 That’s my take on it anyway. 🎨

        Liked by 1 person

  7. Anony Mole
    June 29, 2019

    How’s the weather? 111 F in Carpentras yesterday. How was Mazamet?

    Liked by 1 person

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This entry was posted on June 18, 2019 by in art and tagged , , , , .
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