My Mazamet

Life at β„– 42

The Heart is a Burial Ground: The lost, wild world of Caresse Crosby

Mrs Caresse Crosby takes a ride around the grounds of Rocca Sinibalda, her vast estate just outside Rome in 1964. Photograph: Getty Images

“She is credited with inventing the modern bra, launched Salvador Dali on the international arts scene and founded a publishing house for writers including Hemingway, Joyce and Faulkner. But the extraordinary life of Caresse Crosby, a notorious figure in 1920s bohemian Paris, has been largely forgotten.

Now her remarkable story is being told, and in parts re-imagined, in a book written by her great-granddaughter, Tamara Colchester.”

The Heart is a Burial Ground, by Tamara Colchester, is published by Simon & Schuster on 8 MarchΒ 

Source: The lost, wild world of Caresse Crosby, notorious queen of 1920s Paris society | Books | The Guardian

Sounds absolutely fascinating. I wonder what those Italian men were thinking as they lugged her around. Extraordinary how much society can change in a relatively short time. I can’t imagine anyone (in Europe) successfully convincing their house staff to carry them around in a sedan chair these days. Imagine the conversation – “Look I’m going to sit in this chair, and the two of you are going to carry it from the house to under that tree over there.”

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27 comments on “The Heart is a Burial Ground: The lost, wild world of Caresse Crosby

  1. Sadah
    February 26, 2018

    This is nice.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Carmen
    February 26, 2018

    Now they buy golf carts. πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  3. makagutu
    February 26, 2018

    Are you sure you have not tried to get yourself carried around, like a prince?

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Steve Ruis
    February 26, 2018

    What, we are to celebrate the inventor of that modern torture device, the bra?! Merde!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Hariod Brawn
    February 26, 2018

    Quite a woman. From wiki:

    She told a reporter that the castle (Rocca Sinibalda, as pictured) had 320 rooms, “At least that’s what the villagers tell me.”

    Liked by 1 person

  6. jim-
    February 26, 2018

    I could picture Esme traveling this way.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. inspiredbythedivine1
    February 26, 2018

    I had the police carry me into a paddy wagon once after a night of binge drinking and they seemed quite eager to do it. Does that count?

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Arkenaten
    February 26, 2018

    Or …. it could simply be a staged photograph.

    Yes, there is always one kill-joy!

    Liked by 1 person

    • inspiredbythedivine1
      February 26, 2018

      Good point. If Stanley Kubrick can stage and fake the moon landing in ’69, how hard could staging a picture like this be?

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Tish Farrell
    February 26, 2018

    This inevitably makes me think of colonial Africa and ‘the white man’s burden’ which involves more than touch of irony since it was African peoples who had to lug the white men and women all over the place. Even given the passage of time and changes in sensibility, I’m wondering what kind of grown up person considers it OK to use other humans as beasts of burden. Hm. I’m also wondering if there is a connection between this form of transport and the reasons for re-engineering of the bra…

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Dr Martina Feyzrakhmanova
    February 26, 2018

    β€œLook I’m going to sit in this chair, and the two of you are going to carry it from the house to under that tree over there IN YOUR SHORTS.”

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Bela Johnson
    February 27, 2018

    Funny you say that, I, too was wondering what the two men carrying her must have been thinking. Something along the lines of, ‘crazy white woman.’

    Liked by 1 person

    • The Pink Agendist
      February 27, 2018

      When I was a child my grandmother used to have an employee check the bedrooms for mosquitoes… so I imagine the idea of the crazy white woman must be very common πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

      • Bela Johnson
        February 27, 2018

        I live in a culture where it is so. Amazing, the entitlement when we all sit down to shit, the same. ❀

        Liked by 1 person

  12. acflory
    February 27, 2018

    -grin- One of my in-laws tells the story of her Great Aunt being ferried around in a wheelbarrow, but I guess that’s Australia for you. Me, I think I’d prefer that golf buggy. πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    • The Pink Agendist
      February 27, 2018

      It’s only really Australia if it was being pushed by a kangaroo (with a koala on its shoulders) πŸ˜€

      Like

      • acflory
        March 1, 2018

        lmao – we have had kangaroos and wallabies turning up in unusual places lately. And a snake in the middle of town! That was just plain weird though.

        Liked by 1 person

  13. Osyth
    February 27, 2018

    I’m supposed to be paring down prior to a big move but I can’t resist buying this book. Thank you so much for bringing it to my attention 😊

    Liked by 1 person

    • The Pink Agendist
      February 27, 2018

      ItΒ΄s discounted if you pre-order from the Guardian book shop πŸ™‚

      Like

      • Osyth
        February 27, 2018

        Oh thank you … I will this very afternoon 😊

        Liked by 1 person

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This entry was posted on February 26, 2018 by in art, life and tagged , , , .
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