My Mazamet

Life at β„– 42

The African Textiles Are in Place

 

Image result for berber women

I’ve missed these terribly. They’re either Ajar veils or Bakhnug shawls, which are part of the attire of Berber women. We had them in the hall in Sotogrande (the deep red piece on the right):

And we’ve been waiting for some dusty activities to be done before putting them up here – as now Mike is no longer working on building II, things here at the house are starting to move more quickly.

ignore the intercom

In Spain they hung either side of the living room door, and here we’ve done the same thing. Forgive the pictures, the light today is horrendous.

You can’t tell from the photos, but they go a long way to making the hall more lively and friendly. I wasn’t sure how they’d look in the context of a consummately French interior, but they’re great. Black, white and red is usually a safe bet.

Bakhnugs come in red and beige, like ours, in cream and black and also in a wonderful indigo blue which you can see here. And if you’re interested in this sort of thing, there’s a really wonderful well illustrated text (by an expert) here.

from the text: “…These shawls are woven with white cotton on white wool. They are dowry pieces and are dyed only after marriage. It is said that white is for young women, red is for mature and blue is for older women; however, there are enough variations on this idea to merit further investigation. [A similar color symbolism seems to be practiced by Turkmen who wear the chyrpy, although white, in the Turkmen usage, seems honorific, and is awarded to mothers (only) over 60 seen to merit it.]”

28 comments on “The African Textiles Are in Place

  1. jmnowak
    February 20, 2018

    I’m curious about the shadowplay on the walls; a fantastic effect.

    Liked by 1 person

    • The Pink Agendist
      February 20, 2018

      Amusing, isn’t it? We had a similar effect (which we loved) in the last house with Moroccan cut-out metal lanterns. To reproduce that here but in a more classical way, we’ve used cut glass lanterns:

      Liked by 1 person

      • jmnowak
        February 20, 2018

        Yes, it is amazing. Unlike wallpaper, when you get tired of the design, just change a simple lantern glass. Sweet.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Merilee
    February 20, 2018

    Beeyootifull!!

    Liked by 1 person

    • The Pink Agendist
      February 20, 2018

      I believe the Canadian textile museum has some very good pieces of this type πŸ™‚

      Like

      • Merilee
        February 20, 2018

        I’ll need to go look. I have a variety of African hangings from when my parents lived in Nigeria and Sierra Leone. Have run out of wallspace…too many bookshelves…embarrassment of richesπŸ€“

        Liked by 1 person

      • The Pink Agendist
        February 20, 2018

        Wow!!!! I’m a HUGE fan. African art is absurdly under-appreciated. Most people have no idea of the extraordinary things they make (and have made.)

        Like

  3. Tish Farrell
    February 20, 2018

    Fabulous!

    Liked by 1 person

    • The Pink Agendist
      February 20, 2018

      Imagine wearing them! What were textiles like where you were in Kenya?

      Liked by 1 person

      • Tish Farrell
        February 20, 2018

        Kenya’s textiles are really of colonial origin – the cotton wrap or kanga with pithy Swahili sayings, derived from lengths of uncut men’s paisley patterned handkerchiefs. So jolly not arty. Prior to cotton their clothing was skin wraps. In Zambia they did make amazing bark cloth, though the craft was banned by the British because they wanted all ‘the natives’ to buy Manchester cotton (sins of my forefathers). So not much surviving and nothing like your wonderful pieces. West Africa has much richer traditions as you probably know. I have a lovely Mali blanket and some Bambara mudcloth also from Mali.

        Liked by 1 person

  4. coteetcampagne
    February 20, 2018

    Beautiful pieces.
    As well as French, we have English, Welsh, Spanish, Moroccan, Italian and Indian pieces.
    If it’s good design and it suits why not?

    Liked by 1 person

  5. coteetcampagne
    February 20, 2018

    Sotogrande is beautiful too

    Liked by 1 person

    • The Pink Agendist
      February 21, 2018

      It’s a gorgeous place. If we could afford it I’d love to have a place there to spend the winter which is wonderfully mild.

      Like

  6. davidprosser
    February 21, 2018

    The textiles are beautiful.
    Hugs

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Osyth
    February 21, 2018

    Exquisite they are …. you clearly don’t allow foolish boundaries and rigid rules when you are creating an interior. I am of the same school – if it works, it works … these do quite beautifully and I can imagine they soften the hallway in every way whilst also drawing the eye to bask in their beauty and giving off a softly softly enveloping delight which in some sense is their original raison d’Γͺtre.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. acflory
    February 21, 2018

    The indigo blues are lovely but the red is just so lush. I wonder if the Berber women wore such vibrant colours because the landscape was harsh and un-pretty?

    Liked by 1 person

    • The Pink Agendist
      February 21, 2018

      I’m not sure. The use of colours in certain parts of North Africa is quite amazing. Have you heard of the blue city called Chefchaouen?

      Like

      • acflory
        February 21, 2018

        No, but I’m just about to look it up. πŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

      • acflory
        February 21, 2018

        Oh. My. God….that is insanely beautiful!

        Liked by 1 person

      • The Pink Agendist
        February 21, 2018

        Amazingly beautiful in a surreal sort of way πŸ™‚

        Like

      • acflory
        February 22, 2018

        πŸ˜€ I was too gobsmacked to think of it yesterday, but now I can’t help wondering how on earth they keep it so blue? Paint every day?

        Liked by 1 person

      • The Pink Agendist
        February 22, 2018

        There are two methods I know of which are used in North Africa and certain parts of Southern Europe. The more common one in Morocco is mixing tints into the render (sandy finish). The other is tinted lime. Those white villages in Spain are (at least were historically) lime washed πŸ™‚

        Like

      • acflory
        February 22, 2018

        Aaaaah, okay. So tinted render would keep its colour as it weathered. Or perhaps the colours would change gradually as different layers were exposed. That makes sense. Not sure about the lime wash though. I assume that would have to be reapplied at regular intervals. Interesting. πŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

  9. Bela Johnson
    February 21, 2018

    Nice history, though in the end, I’m one of those designers who favors red in every room. Just a bit works in this grand place πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  10. You seem happier Pink. Less darkness. Am I right?

    Liked by 1 person

    • The Pink Agendist
      February 22, 2018

      We’re getting back to our normal routine now that Mike’s home again all the time – that helps a lot. Unsupervised I’m dangerous πŸ™‚

      Like

  11. Scottie
    February 24, 2018

    Pink, you have a talent for decorating, and the patience to wait for what you want. I wonder if you could live anywhere in the world for any length of time, where would it be and why? Best wishes. Hugs

    Liked by 1 person

    • The Pink Agendist
      February 24, 2018

      Thanks πŸ™‚
      I love it here. The weather’s more changeable and dramatic than Spain, and the winter isn’t too harsh. If I could make one change though, I’d make it so I never had to leave the house πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

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This entry was posted on February 20, 2018 by in design, Mazamet and tagged , , , , .
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