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The ecology of human fear: survival optimization and the nervous system | Neuroscience

Lima and Dill’s predator-prey model

“In this article, we gather ecological theories and empirical data from a variety of related fields in an attempt to create a unified model of how humans predict, respond to, control and learn about danger. We will discuss hierarchical theories of threat, how these hierarchies are represented within a global neural architecture, and present evidence for components of an optimized survival system in humans, which is consistent with (c.f. Blanchard et al., 2011), and sometimes distinct from those observed in other animals.

The Survival Optimization System (SOS) is based on the assumption that a set of systems have evolved to avoid and combat threats that pose danger to the species’ fitness. These extend from neurocognitive systems that predict the sensory environment, orienting toward potential threat, assessing threat and escape possibilities, and to hard-wired defensive reactions instantiated by the oldest sectors of the nervous system. In tandem, these survival strategies are steered by modulatory systems including cognitive appraisal and learning systems.”

Source: Frontiers | The ecology of human fear: survival optimization and the nervous system | Neuroscience

Fantastic read. I’ve taken a pause from the Dias book to have a look at the research (some which he cited, some which he didn’t.) This paper is particularly interesting (and available free by clicking on the link above.) A bell rang in my head yesterday which reminded me of something I read on the similarities between human and ant societies

 

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9 comments on “The ecology of human fear: survival optimization and the nervous system | Neuroscience

  1. john zande
    July 3, 2017

    I’ll await your critique

    Liked by 1 person

    • makagutu
      July 3, 2017

      Just what he said.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Hariod Brawn
      July 3, 2017

      Yeah please, me too, 140 characters inc. smileys.

      Liked by 2 people

      • The Pink Agendist
        July 3, 2017

        At your age I understand the need for brevity 😛

        Liked by 1 person

      • Hariod Brawn
        July 3, 2017

        Ageist bastard!

        Liked by 1 person

      • The Pink Agendist
        July 3, 2017

        Ex-cuse me. I’m the firstborn. The bastard is the one in Tahiti.
        I’ve been meaning to ask you… do you not think contentment might be unhelpful to us as animals? I say as animals because I know it may be helpful to the mind.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Hariod Brawn
        July 3, 2017

        I know what you mean. We all have desires, of course. Then we can break those down into preferences on the one hand (and to which we have a certain degree of emotional neutrality towards), and cravings on the other (to which we have intense emotional attachments). I would say the contented human animal, rare beast that s/he is, is without craving and its polar opposite, hatred, though is not without preferences, and may pursue those energetically, yet still without attachment, meaning without an emotional neediness. S/he continues to evolve in this disposition.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Pingback: The ecology of human fear: survival optimization and the nervous system | Neuroscience — Just Merveilleux? – ~*~tightlines and sunshine~*~

  3. Pingback: The ecology of human fear: survival optimization and the nervous system | Neuroscience — Just Merveilleux? | Team OCC

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This entry was posted on July 2, 2017 by in thinking aloud and tagged , , .
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