Just Merveilleux?

Life at № 42

From Simulation Confusion by K. Sanes

allwar

“… more often, we are being deliberately tricked, by people who have something to gain by manipulating us with misleading appearances. Indeed, much of America’s economy is based on providing consumers with deceptive simulations, from knockoffs and fake IDs to padded shoulders and tinted contact lenses. As a result, we find ourselves in a new kind of surroundings, in which we can no longer always rely on the evidence of our senses to tell us what is real.”

“…These fields provide a good model of contemporary society, which has become a Hobbesian world of simulators and dupes, con artists and the conned, in which people routinely manipulate appearances to get what they want. When we look behind these invented appearances, what we often find are advanced forms of art and technology that make it possible for people to present an image of themselves, and of products, situations and ideas, that tells a story.

Indeed, society is now governed by various groups that use deceptive simulations to gain and hold on to money and power. The most important of these groups can be found in business, entertainment, politics and news. And their most important tool of deception is our society’s primary simulation machine — television — which allows them to create complex simulations that can trick people, en masse. Americans, glued to their television sets, are exposed to (although not always fooled by) hundreds of these deceptive simulations in an average day, which are fabricated in an effort to falsify their view of the world and control their behavior.”

Full text: Simulation Confusion (it’s a short essay which I highly recommend. Look out for the part about news.)

 

In the past few days I’ve been watching documentaries on WWII and Hitler. We’ve got some interesting material because Mike did quite a bit of research on Hitler’s mannerisms, movements and speech style for the 1990 A Plot to Kill Hitler. He played a Hitler on the edge of sanity.

mikehitler

The makeup people did an amazing job.

People are making so many comparisons of the political climate  (and techniques) then and now I thought it would be interesting to revisit history.

The one unquestionable similarity we find throughout is the appeal to confusion- which is why I linked to the text above. This is fantastically disturbing because it’s an attack on the foundation of civilization. Without common agreement on, say, the meaning of words- we’re lost. Hitler knew this and even said: “As soon as one point is removed from the sphere of dogmatic certainty, the discussion may not simply result in a new and better formulation, but may easily lead to endless debates and general confusion.”

People are attempting to present the matter as “genuine valid disagreements/differences of opinion”- but of course, intentional deception is anything but. Take the example of Mrs. Clinton’s alleged illness, or the supposed involvement of Ted Cruz’s father in the Kennedy assassination, those aren’t matters of opinion. When there’s no evidence to support a position but you do anyway (and worse, for personal gain), that’s not an opinion, it’s in essence fraud.

Advertisements

25 comments on “From Simulation Confusion by K. Sanes

  1. Steve Ruis
    February 14, 2017

    Interestingly, economists still base their models on “free market” ideals, such as purchasers of goods having “perfect information.” If these so-called economists (aka bullshite artists) believed what they were saying, they would be pushing for the outlawing of advertising as market distorting scams. The purpose of most advertising is deception, not education.

    Liked by 3 people

  2. Hariod Brawn
    February 14, 2017

    All this, of course, is Bannon’s specialism.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Ruth
    February 14, 2017

    “Take the example of Mrs. Clinton’s alleged illness, or the supposed involvement of Ted Cruz’s father in the Kennedy assassination, those aren’t matters of opinion. When there’s no evidence to support a position and you do it anyway (and worse, do so for personal gain), that’s not an opinion, it’s in essence fraud.”

    We are in an age of “alternative facts,” more commonly known as lies. The media has, in large part, played into the hands of an administration wishing to create such confusion. The current administration wants to define reality to suit them. Poor fact-checking and no fact-checking at all in an effort to be the one with the big scoop to score ratings has given this administration the ammunition in needs to discredit any and all news stories that it doesn’t like as fake news. Once credibility has been eroded in a media outlet people won’t believe any story that comes from that outlet. That has perfectly set up the new administration to push propaganda, speculation, and outright lies as reality and their supporters defend it at all costs. Scary stuff. Very scary stuff.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Ruth
      February 14, 2017

      You would think with all the noise being made about fake news people would research a little bit about “bombshell” news stories from obscure websites, but no. They eschew main stream media in favor of these obscure websites specifically for the purpose of confirmation bias.

      Case in point: an acquaintance of mine posted this article on social media yesterday and simply commented, “Wow!” O_O

      http://conservativepost.com/video-those-3-muslim-brothers-arrested-for-spying-on-trump-were-hired-by-obama-this-is-happening/

      I knew before I ever even clicked on the article that it was click-bait. But she’d swallowed the hook down to her navel because of her bias against the Obama administration. It supposedly had a video with it, but I couldn’t play the video. The video was made to appear to be a legitimate Fox News story, but I couldn’t find it nor any of the details on the Fox News website and subsequently noticed that the video was undated.

      I responded with, “Hey, Sandra. Do you have any more information about this? I really do try to read and/or watch most news articles that people post so I can get all sides of an issue. I just did a search on the Fox News website and couldn’t find the article that the picture references nor the names of those three men. Do you have anything else?”

      Crickets.

      Now, the article in question points to both Brietbart and The Daily Caller, both sending up alarm bells. The Daily Caller story points to Politico and BuzzFeed, both legitimate news outlets but the stories there give absolutely zero of the details given in the fake articles. The details are not sourced at all in these articles. Do you think she cares? Nope.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Yesterday right here on a post that mentioned conflicts of interest someone said I was being unfair as I hadn’t mentioned **Michelle Obama’s 41 million from Subway**. When I asked if Mrs. Obama (or anyone connected to her) had actually received any money at all, the answer was: “but a conflict of interest doesn’t have to involve money.”
        That’s more than moving goal posts, it’s stealing them and taking them home.

        Liked by 3 people

      • Ruth
        February 14, 2017

        Forty-one million what from Subway**? Sandwiches?!? I mean, wouldn’t 41 million imply money? Smh…

        Liked by 1 person

      • Precisely. Phrasing used to deceive. It implies money and it implies Mrs. Obama took that money.

        Like

      • Ruth
        February 14, 2017

        I think using the word “implies” is being generous. I more than implies that she received 41 million of something. Maybe it was those little hole-punches you get on your card when you buy so many sandwiches?

        Liked by 1 person

      • makagutu
        February 14, 2017

        Stealing goalposts and taking them home! Now, that’s a good one

        Liked by 1 person

      • And then making them into a crucifix 😀

        Like

  4. dpmonahan
    February 14, 2017

    Confucianism talks about “the rectification of names”, of bringing back the meaning of words, just to indicate how old the issue is. We build up a system of euphemisms for profit and to cover unpleasant facts, but eventually the euphemisms can’t hold anymore.
    Interesting the article didn’t list education: teachers pretending to teach, students pretending to learn, researchers publishing garbage and hoping no one reads it, etc.

    Liked by 3 people

  5. makagutu
    February 14, 2017

    The media here, I don’t know about elsewhere, manipulates the viewers. They determine what people will watch, read and even talk about. It’s all manipulation

    Liked by 1 person

  6. inspiredbythedivine1
    February 14, 2017

    Just watched an excellent German film about Hitler popping up suddenly in 2014 called, “Look Who’s Back.” It’s funny but deeply pertinent to every issue going on today with Trumpanzees, their warped sense of reality, and the media’s blindness to
    it all. Good, scary stuff, and America and tRump aren’t mentioned once.

    Liked by 2 people

  7. acflory
    February 15, 2017

    “that’s not an opinion, it’s in essence fraud”
    Bit late to the discussion but, hell yeah! My only quibble would be calling TV the tool of all evil. Surely these days its Facebook?

    Liked by 1 person

    • All of the above + the internet as a whole. It’s become much easier for people to live in a bubble where their alternate facts get validated and even applauded.

      Like

      • acflory
        February 15, 2017

        -nods- I think humans instinctively gravitate to those who are similar to themselves. Let’s face it, most of the people who come to your Salon are looking for other people who enjoy debating and stretching their mental muscle. The problem with bubbles is not that we like them, but that we no longer have any kind of reliable ‘reality checks’ from the outside. Investigative journalists used to provide that reality check, at least some of the time, but now they follow the trends rather than critiquing/exposing them. 😦

        Like

  8. Clare Flourish
    February 15, 2017

    Thank you for sharing the essay. You could read it in the same way as the news it criticises- it starts with a threat to the community, “with all the potential that has for evoking sympathy, fear and anger in audiences”, and ends with a solution to “convert these emotions into reassurance and hope”. The solution is Increased Vigilance. We can also know that we, the writer and readers, are in on a secret which makes us special.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Absolutely true- but the method he uses to present the case doesn’t invalidate the case he’s making 🙂

      Like

      • Clare Flourish
        February 15, 2017

        It reduces the effectiveness of his attack, though. I hear that a cyclist was killed near where I cycle myself. Bloody ‘ell, I think. The driver says she just didn’t see him though he should have been clearly visible for five seconds. Then I read that she was disqualified and imprisoned. I feel slightly better at that. It’s news relevant to me. It is true. It need not skew my understanding of the threats I face.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Agreed.

        Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Information

This entry was posted on February 14, 2017 by in activism and tagged , , , , .
%d bloggers like this: