Just Merveilleux

Life at № 42

The Balustrade Gilding Test

balustrade (3)

This is one of those things that we only really know once we see it. I was going through my Maison Jansen books yesterday after posting and I decided to take the plunge. I’ve been a Jansen fanatic forever, so I came to the conclusion that if in their original plans the florettes were gilt, then I’d surely like them gilt as I’ve rarely seen anything from their early period which I didn’t like. I decided to use a liquid gilding medium to have an idea of the overall effect before forking over the cash for real gold leafing.

balustrade (1)

… and I’m very pleased. It just adds that little something extra that wakes up the hall. I considered doing the little spheres as well, but I don’t think it’s necessary.

That being settled, I still need to find a tapestry to fill up the space over the stairs, and choose a runner for the stairs themselves. For a bit of fun I’m seriously considering a Madeleine Castaing style leopard print.

See original image

The tapestry will be a verdure. If I can find find a Chinoiserie verdure for a reasonable price, that would be fantastic- but if not I’ll make do with a regular verdure.

See original image

                                              18th century Chinoiserie Verdure

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14 comments on “The Balustrade Gilding Test

  1. metan
    November 28, 2015

    Should have checked my email before I commented on the last post! 😀

    I like it, it’s just enough to break up the black.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. tildeb
    November 28, 2015

    Beautiful. And it leads the eye. I’m a big fan of metal work so I’m looking forward to seeing how the runner you select works next to it (I’m more of a subtle-but-contrasting-geometric-pattern-to-lead-the-eye-to-where-I-want-it-to-go kind of person when it comes to runners but I’ve never had such competition from the banister itself).

    Like

    • Mr. Merveilleux
      November 28, 2015

      Yes, I think it works. When it was all black one didn’t really notice the finesse of the metalwork, now I think it really hits you when you walk through the hall.
      Everything in the room is dramatic, from the checkerboard encaustic tiles to the balustrade- so the runner’s going to have a tough job keeping up 🙂

      Like

  3. john zande
    November 28, 2015

    Hey, it does seem to work. In the photo, at least, it rings true. Well done.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Helen Devries
    November 28, 2015

    I rather liked the metalwork as it was….I’m not sure that I’d lash out on the hard stuff before putting the runner and tapestry in place.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. clubschadenfreude
    November 28, 2015

    the raven is happy 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Elizabeth
    November 28, 2015

    It is lovely, I think I was freaked by the sample photo that you posted. It seems barely possible that a year has one by.

    Like

    • Mr. Merveilleux
      November 28, 2015

      That’s why I had to do the test. There are things that work well in theory and end up horribly when translated to real-life and vice-versa.
      Time is a terrible thing. To be honest I even find it hard to believe/understand I’m not 22 anymore, and that was 15 years ago 😀 !!!

      Like

  7. karenjane
    November 28, 2015

    It looks wonderful – in the previous photos, the light was different, & in these the walls seem a warmer colour, which really emphasises the golden bits. It’s probably a daft question, but I’ll ask it anyway – are both sides gilded?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Mr. Merveilleux
      November 28, 2015

      During the day the amount of light coming in just flushes out all the colour, that’s why I think the room really needs some warmth (gold helps with that.) The tapestry over the stairs will do some of the work, and downstairs we’re going to have the two deep red 18th century Tunisian wedding mats that were hanging in the entrance hall in Spain.
      And yes, both sides will be gilded 🙂

      Like

  8. wcs
    November 29, 2015

    I agree: it works well. Just enough to add visual interest and not too much to become garish.

    Like

  9. davidprosser
    November 29, 2015

    The liquid gilding works just as well as the gold leaf would and can save you money for other projects. I have to say it looks fantastic in the pictures.Enough is as good as a feast as they say. ( Who the heck are ‘they’ by the way?)
    Hugs

    Like

  10. I like your idea for the stair runner. I like a mix of styles & periods and the runner will accomplish that. Will you be using brass bars on each stair to hold the runner in place?

    The gilding looks perfect! Great idea you had to test it out first. But if it looks good I think I would leave it as as and come back to the gold leaf project at a later time. You have so many other projects going on. This was an open question which you now have the answer to, the full implementation can easily wait.

    Like

  11. roughseasinthemed
    November 30, 2015

    I think choosing the florettes is just right, would have been my suggestion to not go ott. Although I also liked the starkness of the black. Whichever. Both ok. How did you paint the outside of the rails, scaffolding or trestles?

    Is it real gold paint, or that ghastly stuff that blackens after five minutes? My parents had some gold in their somewhat ornate dining room. Gold leaf on the cornice and a standard lamp, and the wallpaper was a gold colour, it was the time of picture wallpaper being fashionable, so sketches of villages or something. Our decorator copied the scene perfectly (freehand) onto the back of the door using gold paint. It was still gleaming when the room was finally redecorated and it was painted out. As was the gold leaf 😦

    Gold leaf must cost a fortune these days!

    Like

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This entry was posted on November 28, 2015 by in Mazamet and tagged , , , , , .
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